construction workers
construction workers
Sudden Safety Consultants
Sudden Safety Consultants

OUR OFFICE

Sudden Safety Consultants

2473 Frederick Douglas Blvd

(btwn 132nd & 133rd Streets)

New York, NY  10027

 

PHONE:  (646) 797-9481

EMAIL:   SuddenSafety2@aol.com

FAX:      (866) 277-9342

 

Pay NOW online, call us, or fill out our online inquiry form. You can FAX in your credit card payment too.

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WHAT'S NEW AT OSHA

New OSHA Requirements

hazard communication

Revised Hazard Communication Standard - December 1st, 2013 Training Requirements

 

The first compliance date of the revised HCS is December 1, 2013. By that time employers must have trained their workers on the new label elements and the SDS format. This training is needed early in the transition process since workers are already beginning to see the new labels and SDSs on the chemicals in their workplace. To ensure employees have the information they need to better protect themselves from chemical hazards in the workplace during the transition period, it is critical that employees understand the new label and SDS formats.

 

"Exposure to hazardous chemicals is one of the most serious threats facing American workers today," said U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. "Revising OSHA's Hazard Communication standard will improve the quality and consistency of hazard information, making it safer for workers to do their jobs and easier for employers to stay competitive."

crystalline silica - silica dust

OSHA’s Proposed Crystalline Silica Rule

 

Workers who inhale very small crystalline silica particles are at increased risk of developing serious silica-related diseases. These tiny particles (known as “respirable” particles) can penetrate deep into workers’ lungs and cause silicosis, an incurable and sometimes fatal lung disease. Crystalline silica exposure also puts workers at risk for developing lung cancer, other potentially debilitating respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and kidney disease.

 

To improve worker protection, OSHA is proposing two new crystalline silica standards: one for general industry and maritime, and the other for construction. The proposals are based on extensive review of scientific evidence, current industry consensus standards, and OSHA’s outreach, including stakeholder meetings, conferences, and meetings with employer and employee organizations. 

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